Want to meat your maker? Keep up that high protein diet
March 5th, 2014
09:45 AM ET
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Eating a high-protein diet in middle age could increase your risk of diabetes and cancer, according to a study published this week in the journal Cell Metabolism. But don't stay away from meat for too long – the same study showed those over 65 need more protein to reduce their mortality risk.
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February 27th, 2014
12:15 AM ET
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Choosing healthier foods at the grocery store may soon be a little easier.

The Food and Drug Administration is proposing several changes to the nutrition labels you see on packaged foods and beverages. If approved, the new labels would place a bigger emphasis on total calories, added sugars and certain nutrients, such as Vitamin D and potassium.

The FDA is also proposing changes to serving size requirements in an effort to more accurately reflect what people usually eat or drink. For example, if you buy a 20-ounce soda, you're probably not going to stop drinking at the 8-ounce mark. The new rules would require that entire soda bottle to be one serving size - making calorie counting simpler.
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Bugs, sand and other stuff in your food (on purpose)
February 10th, 2014
10:15 AM ET
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Anyone who's ever read a nutrition label knows that our food supply is full of hard-to-pronounce chemicals. Most are generally recognized as safe, as the Food and Drug Administration likes to say, but a few have given scientists cause for concern.

Azodicarbonamide, for instance. Subway announced last week that it would be removing the controversial chemical from its bread. Generally used for strengthening dough, azodicarbonamide is also found in yoga mats and shoe soles, according to the Centers for Science in the Public Interest. One of the breakdown products is a recognized carcinogen.

Though Subway is going to remove azodicarbonamide, there's a long list of other chemicals used in its bread: calcium carbonate, calcium sulfate, ammonium sulfate, DATEM, sodium stearoyl lactylate, potassium iodate and ascorbic acid, according to the restaurant's website (PDF).

And Subway certainly isn't alone. What other chemical additives are commonly found in your food? Here are seven, picked at random as good practice for the upcoming CNN Spelling Bee (just kidding).
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January 15th, 2014
05:15 PM ET
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Paignton Zoo in Devon, England, isn't monkeying around with their animals' diets anymore. Zookeepers are trading the monkeys' favorite fruit in for green leafy vegetables, saying bananas grown for human consumption are full of sugar and calories.

"Wait, even the fruit isn't healthy anymore? What's left?!?!" CNN reader NeoPrudentist posted in what was soon rated the No. 1 comment on the story.

What's left, indeed. First coffee. Then salmon. Now this?
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Filed under: Animal Rights • Food Politics • Health News


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