May 31st, 2013
09:00 AM ET
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“Before we begin, you must all be warned nothing here is vegetarian. Bon appétit.”

One would expect nothing less from Dr. Hannibal Lecter in NBC’s new drama “Hannibal.” After all, the serial-killer psychiatrist, made most famous by Anthony Hopkins in 1991’s “The Silence of the Lambs,” cemented his love for human flesh with the iconic line, “A census taker once tried to test me. I ate his liver with some fava beans and a nice Chianti.”

The love for the forbidden meat is front and center in the primetime series based on Thomas Harris’ novels. Lecter, played by Mads Mikkelsen, is an adept chef with a penchant for unusual ingredients.

“What he eats is what defines him,” explained Toronto-based food stylist Janice Poon who, along with chef José Andrés, creates the stunning, lush and creepy meals for “Hannibal.”
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Filed under: Television • Visual Art


November 30th, 2011
08:00 AM ET
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We get food crushes sometimes. It might be a chef whose stracciatella makes our hearts sing (that'd be you, Missy Robbins), a winemaker with a barrel-sized brain and wit to match (cheers, Randall Graham), or a writer out of whom we'd just like to hug the stuffing (we're coming for you, Francis Lam).

This time it's Amy Evans, who we'd always known as the oral historian for the Southern Foodways Alliance. In this capacity, she oversees the organization's efforts to record and archive interviews with Southerners who grow, create, serve, and consume food and drink, so their words and wisdom are preserved for future generations.

That would be reason enough to adore her, but as it happens, she's also an exceptionally gifted painter who, naturally, uses food as the nexus of many of her visual narratives. Her work documents small, intimate histories of characters who we'll never actually meet, but we certainly know the likes of.
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Filed under: Bite • Cuisines • Cultural Identity • Culture • Food Crushes • Southern • Think • Visual Art


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