November 17th, 2013
04:00 PM ET
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He's been called "Captain Outrageous," "The Mouth of the South," and this month, Ted Turner turns 75. Learn more about the founder of 24-hour news: Watch "Ted Turner: The Maverick Man" on CNN Sunday 7 p.m. ET.

"Eat it to save it" may seem like a counterintuitive strategy for preserving an uncommon species, but it may be key to their survival. It's a rallying cry for advocacy groups like Slow Food, activists and chefs who believe that the loss of biodiversity in our diets is a recipe for disaster. CNN founder Ted Turner is at the forefront of the movement, with his campaign to acclimate American palates to bison meat.

As chef Jay Pierce wrote in an Eatocracy op-ed, "If you want to preserve the taste of heirloom produce varieties, such as Arkansas Black, Newtown Pippin, and Ginger Gold apples, for future generations, you must buy them and eat them or the mechanics of capitalism will instruct farmers that there is no room in the marketplace for their product, and they will move on to something else, like Granny Smith or Red Delicious Apples or sub-divided exurban residential plots.
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Filed under: Business and Farming News • Farms • Heirloom • Sustainability


October 28th, 2013
11:00 AM ET
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When Americans hand out Halloween candy this week they may inadvertently be contributing to the destruction of orangutan habitat thousands of miles away.

But don't feel guilty. Instead, do something about it.

Many types of Halloween candy - and lots of other packaged foods in the United States - contain palm oil, much of which is farmed in Malaysia and Indonesia, where orangutans live. Wild forests that support the endangered orangutan are being chopped down and burned to grow geometric rows of trees that ultimately produce oil.
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Filed under: Animal Rights • Climate Change • Environment • Halloween • Sustainability


World Food Day 2013: How to help end hunger
October 16th, 2013
02:45 AM ET
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According to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, 165 million children under the age of five are so malnourished they will never reach their full physical and cognitive potential.

About 2 billion people in the world lack vitamins and minerals that are essential for good health, and around 1.4 billion are overweight - one third of them, obese. Children born to parents suffering from these forms of malnutrition start out with a higher risk of impairment from birth and illness later in life.

Poverty is handed down from generation to generation. Now it's time to stop the cycle.

October 16 is the FAO's annual World Food Day, and the organization is seeking to heighten public awareness of the problem of hunger in the world and stimulate discussions for solutions.
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Filed under: Human Rights • Hunger • Sustainability • World Food Day


Mass shrimp deaths mean jumbo prices
August 16th, 2013
01:30 PM ET
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Shrimp prices are skyrocketing to all-time highs, amid a disease that's plaguing the three largest prawn producers: Thailand, China and Vietnam. White shrimp prices are nearing $6 a pound, up 56% from a year ago, according to an Urner Barry index.

Interestingly though, the Cadillac of crustaceans is cheaper than it's been in a long time. Lobster prices, while still a lot higher than shrimp, have fallen recently. But more about that later.
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