December 24th, 2012
01:30 PM ET
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In Iceland, Christmas is observed the evening of December 24. The day before that, there is a pre-Christmas tradition that some daring folks observe: Eating rotten fish.

One day a year, folks get together and eat putrid skate, accompanied by bread, potatoes and little else.

Throughout the country, wives, husbands and even entire apartment buildings forbid the practice. Few restaurants cook it.

“They say that if you cook it in a house, then you will have to paint the house afterward - or move to another house to get rid of the smell,” said iReporter Halldor Sigurdsson.
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Filed under: 100 Places to Eat • Bite • Buzz • Christmas • Holidays • iReport • Think • Travel • Video


December 8th, 2012
07:00 AM ET
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iReporter Marilynn's grandmother passed away at the age of 100 in 2010, and now honors her at the holidays through making the foods she taught her to treasure. Here, she fries up her grandmother's potato latkes.

There's no written recipe - just the memory of touch, sight and scent - and Marilynn's tie to her family and celebrations past can live on.
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iReport: The Devil Dog is in the details
December 4th, 2012
02:00 PM ET
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Hostess Brands - the maker of popular baked goods such as Twinkies, Ding Dongs and Wonder Bread - announced it is shutting down, blaming a strike by bakers opposed to a new contract.

As the 82-year-old company begins the liquidation process, analysts say that some of its most iconic brand names will likely live on, getting scooped up at auction and attached to products from other companies.

Or ... you can just make your own like these CNN iReporters!
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Filed under: Baked Goods • iReport • Junk • Make • Recipes • Twinkies


Have a sweet holiday and save kitchen memories while you can
November 28th, 2012
10:30 AM ET
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Everything tasted better when my grandma was around.

Growing up, we didn't get to see my dad's side of the family all that often, but I noticed at some point that all the food we ate in Grandma Kinsman's presence was exponentially more delicious. Later on, I came to realize that it wasn't due to some special grandmotherly mojo, but rather that she used real butter rather than margarine, and my family shopped accordingly when she was in town.

No matter the ingredients, I was predisposed to enjoy her cooking. I loved her and she loved me, her weird, short-haired, misfit granddaughter, even if the rest of the world wasn't inclined to. Seldom did I feel that love so strongly as when her yearly shipment of holiday cookies arrived.
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Filed under: Buzz • Chilled Out and Cheery • Christmas • Cookies • Family Recipe Index • Favorites • Feature • Holiday • Holidays • iReport • Make • Recipes


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